A UNEP article on Tunisia’s attempt to reduce its dependence on oil and gas was published online back in 2014.  It elaborates on the contemporary history, technical and financial details of the Tunisian solar power development.

The experience in Tunisia demonstrates the potential returns on investing in renewable energy, creating new jobs, and reducing dependency on fuel imports.

NUR Energy projected to develop a farm of 10 No. 200MW CSP plants that will be located in the southern desert part of the country.  It makes use of BrightSource Energy’s tower design.  Tunisia envisages to export surplus power towards Italy and eventually reaching the UK. 

Here is below excerpts of an interesting article of the Financial Times’ beyondbrics dated May 2015 on the same topic that deserves at this conjecture pondering on. 

Huge solar projects in north Africa target Europe, but will Brussels help? 

By Edward Robinson, Culmer Raphael

One of the most interesting solar projects around, TuNur, hopes to generate two nuclear power plants’ worth of renewable electricity in the Tunisian desert, export it to Italy via a 1,000km high-voltage DC cable and connect it to European grids as far afield as the UK, where it could power over 2m homes.

Three developments are helping and could set a precedent for further projects: strides in the cost-effectiveness both of undersea transmission cables and solar power, the EU’s Energy Union and climate packages, and the new Tunisian government’s liberalisation of its energy laws.

In technological terms the project looks achievable. A €10bn joint venture between British solar developer Nur Energie and a group of Tunisian, Maltese and British investors including London-based Low Carbon, TuNur plans to use Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) – unlike solar photovoltaic panels (PV) – to generate a potential 2.5GW of electricity on 100km2 of desert in South West Tunisia by 2018.

Read on at

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